Jewellery Inspired by the Beauty and History of Iemanjá

Many different gods feature in the ancient beliefs and traditions of Brazil. The goddess Iemanjá (sometimes spelled Lemanja, Yemanja, or Yemoja) holds special significance as representing the ocean and it is Iemanjá who is the inspiration for many jewellery pieces created by The Flying Fox Arts.

 

  The Goddess of the Sea    As the traditional Brazilian belief goes, the goddess Iemanjá is Queen of the Oceans, a mother spirit and the patron spirit of women. The womb of Iemanjá is revered as the source and giver of life and also as the eternal resting place.   She is linked with, and symbolized by, the ocean. Every drop of the sea is a reminder of her beginnings and serves as the inspiration that there are both calm and stormy times in life. She reminds us that the ocean offers bounty and life to those who respect it.   Iemanjá is honoured in festivals in Brazil. Some people present her (the ocean) with offerings for the wellbeing of seafarers and fishermen. In Rio de Janeiro, there is a party on the last day of the year to honour her and welcome in another year. There is a great festival with dancing and singing in the streets. Offerings to her of flowers, gifts, perfume, rice and even watermelon are placed on handmade boats or tossed into the water. As the new year begins, people throw white flowers into the ocean hoping she will grant them their wishes.   As the mother of all Orixas (or Orishas ~ spirits that embody or represent the gods in Yoruba mythology), the ancient belief in Iemanjá has become entwined with modern Catholicism and the Virgin Mary, or Stella Maris. Indeed, in some parts, her feast is celebrated on December 8, which is also the day on which the Catholic Church celebrates the Feast of the Immaculate Conception.   

The Goddess of the Sea

As the traditional Brazilian belief goes, the goddess Iemanjá is Queen of the Oceans, a mother spirit and the patron spirit of women. The womb of Iemanjá is revered as the source and giver of life and also as the eternal resting place. 

She is linked with, and symbolized by, the ocean. Every drop of the sea is a reminder of her beginnings and serves as the inspiration that there are both calm and stormy times in life. She reminds us that the ocean offers bounty and life to those who respect it. 

Iemanjá is honoured in festivals in Brazil. Some people present her (the ocean) with offerings for the wellbeing of seafarers and fishermen. In Rio de Janeiro, there is a party on the last day of the year to honour her and welcome in another year. There is a great festival with dancing and singing in the streets. Offerings to her of flowers, gifts, perfume, rice and even watermelon are placed on handmade boats or tossed into the water. As the new year begins, people throw white flowers into the ocean hoping she will grant them their wishes. 

As the mother of all Orixas (or Orishas ~ spirits that embody or represent the gods in Yoruba mythology), the ancient belief in Iemanjá has become entwined with modern Catholicism and the Virgin Mary, or Stella Maris. Indeed, in some parts, her feast is celebrated on December 8, which is also the day on which the Catholic Church celebrates the Feast of the Immaculate Conception.

 

  The Colours of Iemanjá    Iemanjá's colours are the ocean's shades of blue, white and silver, with her representations having a calming effect and a motherly aura. You can see these colours and the inspiration of her ocean in the many silver,  sapphire and moonstone pieces created at The Flying Fox Arts .   Blue and white represent her maternal nature, her intelligence, her stability, her purity, her guidance, her hope and her grace. The metal offering to Lemanjá is silver, which also links to the moon and its relationship with the oceans. Even her dance is traditionally done in a blue and white dress.   

The Colours of Iemanjá 

Iemanjá's colours are the ocean's shades of blue, white and silver, with her representations having a calming effect and a motherly aura. You can see these colours and the inspiration of her ocean in the many silver, sapphire and moonstone pieces created at The Flying Fox Arts

Blue and white represent her maternal nature, her intelligence, her stability, her purity, her guidance, her hope and her grace. The metal offering to Lemanjá is silver, which also links to the moon and its relationship with the oceans. Even her dance is traditionally done in a blue and white dress.

 

  Iemanjá Jewellery     Jewellery inspired by Iemanjá should feature not only her colours, but also the ocean's waves, the calmness of blue in a sapphire, the purity of moonstone and the offering of silver. Such jewellery should portray and embody grace, calmness, motherhood, femininity and beauty.   Even her name is a contraction of several words that mean "Mother whose children are like fish". Such poetic and inspiring words for creating art.         Creative Commons Attribution: Permission is granted to repost this article in its entirety with credit.

Iemanjá Jewellery  

Jewellery inspired by Iemanjá should feature not only her colours, but also the ocean's waves, the calmness of blue in a sapphire, the purity of moonstone and the offering of silver. Such jewellery should portray and embody grace, calmness, motherhood, femininity and beauty. 

Even her name is a contraction of several words that mean "Mother whose children are like fish". Such poetic and inspiring words for creating art. 

 

 

Creative Commons Attribution: Permission is granted to repost this article in its entirety with credit.